Tag Archives: Employer Value Proposition

Brandemix Bonus Reel: How to Become an Employer of Choice

Director of Interactive Branding, Jason Ginsburg, explains how an organization can get started on the path to becoming an employer of choice.

To learn more, please email us at employerofchoice@brandemix.com

Brandemix Bonus Reel: What is a Brand Plan?

Jason Ginsburg, the Director of Interactive Branding at Brandemix, explains why a brand plan is so important to any branding or re-branding effort.

To learn how Brandemix can help your branding or employer branding campaign, visit www.brandemix.com.

4 Things to Make Sure Your Boss Knows About Employer Branding (The 5th is Optional)

“Employer branding is the new black,” according to George Anders’ recent article on Forbes.com. LinkedIn is spreading the word about the significance of having a strong employer brand while also providing more tools and resources to help companies promote one on their platform.

So you’re not Apple, Amazon, Deloitte, or Disney. Don’t despair. That doesn’t mean you can’t have an employer brand or employer value proposition of your own.

Here are 4 things to tell your boss when you’re putting it into your 2013 budget:

It’s not a headline or tagline within your recruitment marketing materials.
Your employer brand is the essence of the employer/employee contract. It contains the reasons people join your company and the reasons they stay. Intuitively this
information may be known to some or all of your organization, but going through
the exercise of defining your brand architecture, your differentiators, and your employer value proposition will make sure that you’re all speaking in one voice. 

Once this is defined, it may never appear in any of your recruitment marketing
materials or internal communications. 
But the essence of the employer value
proposition can be communicated in a multitude of ways, varying by business
unit, country, or corporate initiative.
It makes the company money.
A well-defined employer brand will be integrated with the business strategy and articulate the shared responsibilities for achieving success. The ROI is not an HR metric (cost-per-hire, time-to-fill) but rather a metric of revenue growth. In March 1994, the Harvard Business Review wrote about the service-profit chain. Employee satisfaction drives customer satisfaction, loyalty, and revenue growth. This relationship still holds true today. Employer branding fuels employee engagement, which fosters productivity, which fuels profitability.


It saves the company money.
Good employer branding connects employees with cultures, reducing the chance of a hiring misfire. There is transparency in the employer-employee contract and
everyone knows the deal going in. Both turnover rates and recruiting costs go down.

It doesn’t cost a lot of money.
Those of you who have attended my employer branding presentations already have many of the tools to do it yourself. But even going outside to bring in an employer branding expert doesn’t have to be an expensive proposition. Communication audits and employer branding surveys can get the ball rolling, and executive interviews and internal focus groups can be selectively added. For a small research plan, costs can be as low as $10,000. If you’re lucky enough to get a bigger budget, I recommend you survey external constituents to really provide context and color to your internal findings.

You will have more fun at work.
Yes, it’s true. Once you have gone through your branding exercise and embedded the essence of your competitive differentiation into your careers website, videos, recruitment and social media marketing, and internal communications, you’re all set to reap the rewards. Happy hiring managers, increased employee referrals, more unsolicited resumés coming in from top talent, lower turnover, and greater retention. You’ll have more time to work on other critical initiatives like workforce planning, talent management, or diversity and inclusion. Or maybe just steal a few extra minutes to read a blog or two.  

5 Secrets of a Great Intranet

What’s an intranet? A site where employees can read their about their benefits? A list of departmental phone numbers? A place where press releases go to die?

You’ve got it all wrong. A good intranet allows a company not just to inform and educate employees, but also to engage and inspire them. In a large enterprise, it might be the only way that employees connect with each other and the senior leaders. If you’re not using your intranet to build brand equity, you’re missing a crucial opportunity to improve employee engagement, satisfaction, and performance.

As the internet has evolved, the important characteristics of an intranet have changed. In fact, intranets don’t have to be accessible only on office computers – how about an intranet app that employees can access on their mobile phones?

To insure that you have an engaging and compelling intranet, make sure it has these five important elements:

Interactive
Intranets should allow communication from employees, not just to them. A weekly poll on the front page is a an easy, no-pressure way to get insights from your staff. A simple question like “How can we best improve our sales channel?” can lead to all sorts of interesting ideas.

Multimedia
It’s almost 2012 – is your intranet still just text? Employees can only look at copy for so long. You should include photos of the senior leadership team, audio of the CEO’s speeches, and videos of company events. You might even allow employees to post their own photos and videos of company parties or field trips. Facebook’s own bloggers have said that sharing pictures is one of the most popular activities on the social network.

Effective intranets engage employees.

Timely
Nothing turns employees off like old news. No matter what exciting content the site has, if an employee sees “Get ready for Election Day 2008!” they won’t take the intranet seriously. Update the site at least once a month; once a week would be preferable. “Breaking news,” such as an employee getting a major reward through the recognition program, can keep employees checking the site frequently.

Organized
You’re going to archive a lot of information on an intranet: benefits information, press releases, company directory, HR documents. But if the employees can’t find the information, the intranet is useless. Have a robust search system that lets users quickly get what they need. Place navigation at both the top and the bottom, with clear and simple drop-down menus. Use the front-page poll to ask employees what information they’re having trouble finding and rearrange the navigation accordingly.

Customizable
All our favorite sites are personalized, from Yahoo homepages that show local weather to sports sites that feature our favorite teams. Make sure that one section of your intranet home screen has a section that employees can personalize with their preferred links. Someone may want to see the company’s stock price while another might want to see how many sick days they have left. A “quick links” section not only saves the employees time; it also gives them a sense of ownership for the page.

Time to "reconstruct" your intranet?

At BRANDEMiX, we apply the principles of branding to employer branding, which covers the entire experience. If you’d like to learn how we can create or improve your intranet, visit our website or call 212-947-1001.

For the latest on social media, online recruiting, mobile marketing, and other branding trends, please like BRANDEMiX on Facebookfollow us on Twitter, and join our LinkedIn group, Your Digital Brand.

EMPLOYER VALUE PROPOSITIONS: Is it time for employers to switch from demands to offerings?


According to today’s Wall Street Journal, some firms are still struggling to hire despite high unemployment. While many of these firms seek hourly employees, and compete against extended unemployment benefits, others are looking for needles in haystacks. The more skilled the applicant, the more the business has to offer to them.

Looking to save some money? This is where the employer value propositions come in handy. In order for your business to attract (and keep) the best potential employees, here are some free things to keep in mind as you seek to influence behavior:

1. Quality of Leadership: The better your leadership in operating your company, the more attractive your business becomes because it’s successful. The more attractive your business is, the higher number of applications you will receive. The higher the number of applicants, the greater a chance of finding the perfect person for your company. Strong leadership is not only extremely beneficial to your company’s success, but it is also a big deciding factor for your future employees.

2. Reputation: With a good reputation comes the willingness for employees to work more for less. People want stability within their jobs and if you and your company can ensure security for potential candidates, your inbox will be flooded with talented people who will be fighting to work for you.

3. J.O.B: Just Offer the Best; the workspace is very important to an employee. If your employees aren’t comfortable with their environment, they’re less eager to do their job with the same quality and effort as if they were somewhere more pleasant.

4. Benefits and Rewards: Here is where you have to think like the employee and ask what about this company makes this the job right for me?” Whether its in the job description, brochure, or in the interview itself, if these questions should be answered without them having to ask; promote yourself!

What most employers don’t realize is that a poorly promoted Employment Value Proposition (EVP) costs them a significant amount of money each year, either through overpaying employees, costs of recruiting or not filling open positions.

Let BRANDEMiX help put your EVP to work for you.